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GHS7 Transition Ends: New year begins with better advice on using chemicals safely at work The new year resolution for workplaces in 2023 will be to update safety information on hazardous and dangerous substances. The new requirement comes into force on January 1, 2023. This change is based on the latest 7th edition of the Globally Harmonised System (GHS7). GHS7 is being adopted nationally to improve classification and labelling and of substances and better inform workplaces about how to safely use hazardous, dangerous, and harmful chemicals and materials. The implementation of GHS7 puts the legal duty on importers and manufacturers of substances to upgrade the safety information of their products. This applies to new substances sold for use in Australia from January 1, and new stock of any substances supplied from then on. Workplaces may continue to use their current stock of substances already classified under the previous GHS editions until that stock is depleted. Progressively all substances supplied will be GHS7 classified and labelled product. Under workplace health and safety law across the state and territory jurisdictions, employers must hold current Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) for all classified substances they use. This ensures they have the safe handling and use information necessary to protect their workers from the health effects of substances they may be exposed to during their work. Suppliers of classified substances must label substances and prepare information in the latest SDS format on how to use the product safely. The format and content must be at the current standard ie. according to the latest GHS edition and reviewed as often as needed to keep the information up-to-date. Employers using classified substances must obtain the SDS from the supplier and follow that advise when the substance is used for work. Employers and providers of substances have had two years to prepare for the implementation of the GHS7 safety regime. It replaces a confusing mix of third, fourth and fifth GHS editions. Regulators said the old system lacked uniformity in format and content and safety advice was inadequate and confusing. A large number of substances are in use in many types of workplaces every day and new substances come on the market each year to help make many work processes more effective and efficient, but not necessarily safer. So improved, standardised safety information is vital in modern workplaces to reduce risk of exposure. Among the other GHS7 changes are easier to read precautionary statements, new advice for preventing eye damage, advice on a new class of substance - “desensitised explosives” - and a new safety criteria for flammable gases and substances supplied in aerosols. Australia’s state and territory regulators claim that GHS7 will make classification more consistent and reduce costs of supply. It will simplify regulatory requirements for businesses operating across multiple jurisdictions and align with the system being adopted by Australia’s trading partners. For more information on the GHS 7 go to Safe Work Australia:
OH&S News

GHS7 Transition Ends

GHS7 Transition Ends: New year begins with better advice on using chemicals safely at work The new year resolution for workplaces in 2023 will be

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Safe Work Australia sets theme for upcoming National Safe Work Month National workplace health and safety policy agency Safe Work Australia has set the theme for National Safe Work Month as “Know safety, work safely - encouraging everyone to make health and safety a priority in the workplace.” National Safe Work Month is their annual campaign to raise awareness of WHS in the community and build knowledge about work health and safety. Throughout October, Safe Work Australia will provide resources for Australian workplaces to run their own events so they too can help build safe and healthy workplaces for all Australians. National Safe Work Month runs for the entire month of October 2022. According to Safe Work Australia preliminary data, 163 people died while doing their job last year. Around 120,300 people made a workers’ compensation claim for serious injury or illness in 2019-20. In addition to the overarching theme of “Know safety, work safely” for 2022, Safe Work Australia also has a theme for each week in October. Week one focuses on Injuries at work – common health and safety risks and how to control them. These may come from slips, trips, falls, or manual handling injuries. The second week focuses on mental or psychological health. Work-related psychological injuries or mental illness significantly impact workers, families, and business and this week will be about conversations on how to improve mental health and safety at work. This week also incorporates an observation of World Mental Health Day on the 10th of October. Week three is about Managing WHS risks and preventing harm. This involves thinking about how workers may be exposed to hazards and what could happen – and how to best minimise those risks. The fourth and final week places emphasis on a Safe and healthy work for all. This looks at the future of workplace safety, changes to work organisation, and future challenges that businesses and workers will need to overcome as the nature of work changes. Businesses may also host their own “SafeTea” chats with workers, to start a conversation about health and safety at work. Workplaces may download co-brandable resources such as a SafeTea chat checklist, posters, video call backgrounds, and more. Click here to find out more. Safe Work Australia is encouraging workplaces to join in raising awareness through social media through using the #safeworkmonth, #KnowSafety and #WorkSafely hashtags. For further information and downloads, visit the National Safe Work Month home page.
OH&S News

National Safe Work Month

Safe Work Australia sets theme for upcoming National Safe Work Month National workplace health and safety policy agency Safe Work Australia has set the theme

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Industry News

The Hazards Of Manual Handling

Statistics from the Australian Bureau of Statistics relating to work-related injuries show in the 2017-2018 period, manual handling tasks are causing nearly one in three

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